Andalusia, architecture, art, photography, Spain, spring, travel

Andalusian Art and Culture

Having been to Andalusia a few times now, I have a real appreciation of the lifestyle and culture, the laid-back attitude and, of course, the need for a siesta in the middle of the day…

Marbella is a lovely resort which has been revived and refreshed to something more like its 1960s heyday (although, thankfully you don’t need to be a millionaire to go there now!

Apart from the miles of golden beaches, the main draw of Marbella, for me, has to be the Old Town.

The Old Town is a winding maze of cobbled streets, cafes, restaurants and shops, selling everything from linen and cotton clothes and home furnishings, to local artisan shops and designer handbags, with wisteria, bougainvillea and hibiscus spilling over you from the balconies above.

Only 45 minutes away by a very reasonably priced direct bus, is Malaga, birthplace to the artist Pablo Ruiz y Picasso.  A beautiful city with architecture old and ancient a-plenty to feast your eyes upon, including this beautiful former Hospital and the Roman Amphitheatre ruins.

As Picasso’s home town, there are a number of Museums / Art Galleries – we decided to go to the Museo Picasso Malaga – which appeared to be the largest, but also had an additional exhibition on which we wanted to visit.

I must admit to never having been a big fan of Picasso, from the few pieces that I have seen, but my view has definitely shifted now, having seen the range of oeuvres including sculpture, ceramics, print-making and his early, more naturalistic paintings.

The additional exhibition was a touring exhibition called Energy Made Visible, focusing mainly on Jackson Pollock’s Mural which was commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim for her New York abode.

IMG_20160427_132126

Although I love Pollock’s drip painting, it was one of the rare occasions when the other exhibits – including those who both inspired and were inspired by Pollock – were more interesting than the main feature.

There were works from artists and photographers that I did not recognise, such as Barbara Morgan, Herbert Matter and this painting by Antonio Saura – La Grande Foule (the Great Crowd) which made more of an impression on me than Pollock’s work.

IMG_20160427_131219

Initially this looks a bit bleak, but in reality the faces vary from comical to the downright scary.  Being a complete geek, I couldn’t help but see a misshapen Darth Vader in the figure on the bottom row, just before the half-way mark.  Can you spot him?

My final surprise was to see a work by Andy Warhol, another artist who I have always thought was over-rated.  This work, entitled Yarn Painting was so eye-catching and bold.  Regular readers will know why I laughed when I found out the name of the work – as a mad-keen crafter, I spend half of my time looking at or working with fibres and yarns!

IMG_20160427_131058

This exhibition is on in Malaga until 11 September so, if you get a chance, take some time out and enjoy Andalucia!

Advertisements
Standard
travel, Uncategorized, yarn

Renewed and reinvigorated

Two colds and a hefty dose of Flu have reduced my capacity to be able to post for a while.  Thankfully all better now!

I have just had a lovely holiday in Marbella (again!) with Mum, where I managed to buy up most of the two haberdashery / wool shops…  Methinks that deserves another whole post to itself…

For now you will have to content yourself with some beautiful pictures of Marbella, including an Andy Warhol piece entitled “Yarn Painting” which of course was my favourite piece in the Picasso Museum in Malaga.

It’s good to be back (oh, except for the weather… and the lifestyle… the culture… and the handsome Latino men…)

Standard
Uncategorized

Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Park (erm, Seafront)!

What a fabulous week it’s been – a fabulous trip to Marbella in Andalusia, Spain, with Mum for a week, relaxing and chilling out.  we spent most of our time wining, dining and watching the world go by in cafes and restaurants!

 

GetAttachment (19) GetAttachment (16)

The walls of the old town in Marbella are covered in beautiful pots and climbers – geraniums, bougainvillea in vibrant pinks, reds and purples.  The Moorish influences and winding alleys with restaurants, shops and apartments are absolutely fascinating.  We spent most of our time here rather than the seafront.

 

 

GetAttachment (6)

 

Everywhere there was music and dance – a dance festival was running all week and most of the events were free and on the street.

As a self-confessed geek I could not, however, believe my luck on our first full day.  We were sitting in a cafe having a croissant and fresh orange juice, and an orchestra sounded up on the bandstand opposite.  Within two notes I squealed in poor Mum’s ear – “it’s Star Wars!”

Those in the UK will remember the TV Show “Name That Tune” will appreciate it when I say – I name that tune in two!  The first two notes of the piece when Luke Skywalker is looking out at two of the moons of Tatooine is apparently called Binary Sunset (starts at about 00:30 on this version) and is a beautiful piece of music.  I had to get the bill pronto and dash across the street to catch them complete a medley of all of the Star Wars music.  My belief (slightly controversial, I know!) is that John Williams is the finest composer of all time.

 

 

 

GetAttachment

 

What a wonderful orchestra they were – for the next two hours they played a wide range of music from Mozart and Beethoven to baroque and another of my favourites – Danse Macabre by St Saens (used as the theme tune for the brilliant TV show Jonathan Creek).  The most remarkable thing was that they were the Malaga Provincial Youth Orchestra, and none of them was over 18.

I wholeheartedly recommend Marbella for a holiday, especially out of season, they are so proud of their town and it is kept so clean and there is a high police presence, so you feel pretty safe (main issues seem to be pickpocketing).

I’ll update later in the week with the crafty happenings in Marbella and further gossip!

Happy crafting!

 

Standard